Leonard Liggio: A Snapshot, Part 3

This is the third in a three part series about Leonard Liggio’s life and influences, Read Part 1, & Part 2. In late summer 1958, Murray and I were invited to be guests at the first MPS general meeting in the US, held at Princeton University Graduate College. Since I was the youngest guest, Jasper Crane, a vice president of Dupont and organizer of the MPS meeting, and his wife, a Dupont heiress, invited me to sit with them at the opening dinner. Jasper Crane’s brother, Edward Crane, was the publisher of Van Nostrand in Princeton which was the publisher of…

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Leonard Liggio: A Snapshot, part 2

This is the second in a three part series about Leonard Liggio’s life and influences. Read Part 1. In Spring 1953, I began to sit in on Mises’ graduate seminar during vacations at Georgetown. Mises’ seminar lectures were the manuscript he was preparing for his publisher, Yale University Press, which wasTheory and History.  Of course, I was particularly interested in this aspect of history, which was foretold in parts of Human Action; and I read the manuscript translation of Ricket’s Science and History. Mises analyzed the foundations of historical sciences in the science of human knowledge. The ‘sciences of laws’ was contrasted with…

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Leonard Liggio: A Snapshot, Part 1

This is the first in a three part series about Leonard Liggio’s life and influences.  My progress to Classical Liberalism began as a child. Until the Summer of 1941 we lived in Miami Beach, Florida. Then and until the early 1950s there were many 15-minute radio commentaries on politics on the four radio networks. My parents listened to them and the news broadcasts. They held opposing views. My father was an Al Smith Democrat (Smith was NY governor & 1928 Dem presidential candidate) and opposed the Republican party on its immigration restriction, its protective tariffs, its alcohol prohibition, etc., which…

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Tocqueville’s Political Economy, A Review by Leonard P. Liggio

I opened Richard Swedberg’s Tocqueville’s Political Economy (Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2009) with much anticipation. Swedberg is professor of sociology at Cornell University and author of Max Weber and the Idea of Economic Sociology, and Schumpeter: A Biography.Sadly, Swedberg is not interested in Tocqueville’s political economy, but in economic sociology. Swedberg acknowledges Tocqueville ‘s study of economics, with some useful pages; but he jumps to an assemblageof random remarks regarding sociology as the subject of his book. I was pleased to discover his reference to my article on page 321, footnote 63: Leonard P. Liggio, “Charles Dunoyer and French…

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Why do some Socialists support market reforms?

Why do some Socialists support market reforms?

by Leonard P. Liggio On July 30, the Atlas Economic Research Foundation sponsored a symposium on the legacy of Milton Friedman on the anniversary of his birth. I had the honor to be one of the speakers. Some of the discussion referred to Milton Friedman’s lectures at the Catholic University of Chile and the influence that his lectures had on the economic reforms in Chile. In passing it was noted that the success of the Chilean economic reforms have not been followed in many Latin American countries. It struck me that there is more to this development. If we add…

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